Forget kunanyi/Mount WellingtonMount Nelson is the lookout to which visitors and newcomers to Hobart should be taken!

It’s positively balmy in contrast to the icy gusts on Mount Wellington, features a brasserie with a tasty menu, showcases the colonial history of Tasmania in the well-preserved signal station and offers a number of well-formed trail walks in all directions.

Mount Nelson at the Signal Station, Hobart, Tasmania, November 2015
The height of 350 metres provides panoramic views of Hobart, the Derwent River, Opossum Bay and beyond.

Mount Nelson Signal Station, Hobart, Tasmania, November 2015
The little signal station is kept open for visitors, and flags are still flown from the tower to welcome large ships into port.

Mount Nelson Signal Station, Hobart, Tasmania, November 2015
In the station, artifacts and photographs are well-labelled and explain the use of semaphore flags (this six-armed semaphore tower could handle over 900,000 separate signals!) before the telephone rendered the technology obsolete.

Mount Nelson at the Signal Station, Hobart, Tasmania, November 2015
The girls are less interested in the historical significance of the area, however, and are instead busy making fortifications out of the bean-bags placed on the hill-side to welcome visitors.

Signal Station Brasserie, Hobart, Tasmania, November 2015
The café at the top offers a breakfast menu, lunch mains and a large selection of desserts and drinks.

The Signal Station Brasserie is open seven days, but not in the evenings. Most items on their menu are made from scratch in the kitchen under the supervision of head chef David Netherly (who trained at Quay in Sydney). Does that sound fancy to you? Well, it tastes pretty good.

Signal Station Brasserie, Hobart, Tasmania, November 2015
Originally the signalman's residence, the building was constructed in 1887 and offers amazing views along with the fine food.

Well-behaved kids are well-tolerated, and the kids’ menu offerings are basically as tasty as the adults’. Fish and chips turned out to be salmon dipped in handmade batter and freshly cooked, and the chips are more cubes of potatoes than the fingers that poke out of paper cups from lesser establishments.

When choosing what to eat, I think you can just randomly select any item without being disappointed. We ordered six different dishes and every plate was polished clean. If it hadn’t been quite so fancy, we would have licked the plates too!

Come for the view, stay for the food! The Mount Nelson Signal Station will be high on our list of places to return to with friends.