We came to Moree to play in the artesian hot pools, but discovered that the town has one of the most distinctive playgrounds in Australia! A fifteen-metre-tall rocket with two twisting tube-slides dominates Kirkby Park and provided us with a lot of fun while we were in town.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
At night, the playground is so well lit up that we couldn't miss it! The girls love playing outside at night.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
As a prevention against vandalism, the two big tube slides and the ladders for climbing up are padlocked shut at night.

As Moree is an RV-friendly town, I felt comfortable parking alongside the park for the night. The only downside of parking alongside a park like this is that when the automatic irrigation comes on during the early morning, we’re woken by the sound of the sprinklers hitting the side of the bus!

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
The new rocket feature was opened in 2009 to coincide with the International Year of Astronomy and the 40th anniversary of the moon landing.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
The rocket playground is already legendary among those families who have travelled through Moree. We heard about the rocket slide at the last place we camped.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
The original rocket was built in 1972 but was sealed shut when it was considered too unsafe for children to continue to play on.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
Five-year-old Calista hangs off the end of the slide, waiting for her sisters to come out. She only went down the slide once — on my lap.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
Brioni screams as she rounds the final bend. The climb up to the top of the rocket slide truly emphasises how long the slide is, and it takes our girls a lot longer to work up the courage to come down the slide than it does to actually slide down.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
Aisha's braver on the descent, but maybe it's because she knows her younger sisters have survived the slide.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
The underside the rocket shades the usual plastic play-equipment that appears on playgrounds across the country.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
A much smaller little playset is great for younger children. Lana tries out a climbing pole with a pattern that is new to our play experiences.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
To the side, a smaller shuttle with dials and levers provides a great background for our children's ample imaginations and gets more attention than the big rocket slides!

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
There's a fancy automatic toilet with a stainless-steel interior off to the side, but the old-fashioned brick toilet block is decorated with mosaics and looks much more inviting.

Rocket playground, Kirkby Park, Moree, NSW, October 2013
The park is also home to a number of shelters with barbecues and picnic tables. At the top of the park, a heritage-listed rotunda provides more shade for large groups.

Kirkby Park is within easy walking distance of Moree’s town centre and a large supermarket. Any families who are travelling through could easily visit the playground while one parent does the shopping. The rocket playground has greatly enhanced the attractiveness of Moree for our family and it could do the same for yours too!