Today, we continued our exploration of the Mornington Peninsula and visited the Peninsula Hot Springs — real hot, deep baths that allow one to relax fully … if you’re not chasing after four small children, that is. The resort is a delight, the facilities are first-class, and the ambience is probably better without small children around. I love this place, but I wouldn’t go again with kids.

Calista in the Peninsula Hot Springs, Rye, Victoria, March 2013
The girls are thrilled to be back in the water again. The temperature is fine, and the pools are mostly shallow enough for Calista to feel fully comfortable swimming around.

Delaney playing at the Peninsula Hot Springs, Rye, Victoria, March 2013
Delaney loves playing in the surrounding landscape. A "natural" creek drops down the slope to a little lake.

Aisha and Brioni playing at Peninsula Hot Springs, Rye, Victoria, March 2013
The girls play non-stop with the toys they recently received from David.

Peninsula Hot Springs, Rye, Victoria, March 2013
The facilities around each hot pool are finished to a very high standard with unique touches, such as round river rocks acting as hooks for towels or robes.

A friend who was working on the resort’s extensions told me that he used to come when the hot water was brought up from the underground aquifer into timber barrels which people would sit in. Now the resort boasts twenty pools with a reflexology walk, Turkish steam room, and sauna.

We didn’t explore the resort fully, as I truly didn’t want to disturb the experiences of the other guests. Our girls love to play and splash in water, and so we mostly stuck to one large pool that we had to ourselves most of the time.

Delaney playing with stones at Peninsula Hot Springs, Rye, Victoria, March 2013
Delaney lines up her pebbles in a row.

Peninsula Hot Springs, Rye, Victoria, March 2013
The setting for the hot pools is tranquil and perfectly finished. This truly is a beautiful resort for relaxing away the city stresses.

We ended our day by calling in at another homeschooling family who lives on the Peninsula. It’s always interesting to see how others live and to hear the stories that bring people to the place where they are when we arrive. Today’s host was a schoolteacher who — after she began allowing her children to learn naturally at home — found that the dichotomy between the school system and the ease with which children learn naturally was too hard to take. Now she makes extra money by providing sewing and music lessons from home.

Thanks, Jacqui, for hosting us. It was a real pleasure to connect with you in real life, and I’m looking forward to seeing how your vision for the rest of your property comes into being!