One of the highlights of our time at the arts festival Fractangular was the way we were surrounded by interesting and surprising artworks. I couldn’t find any information on the artists, however, so I simply present to you some of the works that were sprinkled around the bush doof.

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
A number of these string sculptures (three-dimensional spirographs, you think?) hang around the site.

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Andy Goldsworthy would be proud to shelter in this cubby of branches and leaves.

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
These creatures are part of a zoo, and most of them resemble identifiable mammals.

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Hello ducky! High-density foam is sculpted and painted and then placed in a thick stand of grass near the kids' space.

Decorated bike at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
According to the kids who rode this bike, it was decorated by a "random man" who grabbed it while the crew were setting up the stage and "beautified" it.

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
An intersection of paths is decorated by a corridor of fluorescent string.

I like seeing large artworks in a bush setting. They often mimic organic structures and provide inspiration for our own Goldsworthyesque creations when we’re camping. I hope in the future the organisers of Fractangular will give the artists credit for their pieces, so I can track the artists down who are particularly interesting and see what other wonders they’re creating!

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Bunting hangs from poles, tents and branches.

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Not really an animal, this creepy figure has long, flexible arms.

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Cardboard cut-outs dance within earshot of the music.

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Huge cloth circles are suspended above the dancefloor. They shade the dancers in the day and reflect the lasers at night.

Art at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Coloured balls are strung together and hung up in the trees.

The pleasure of many of these artworks is in their simplicity. They’re not hard to create, they don’t cost a gaziliion dollars in materials, and they’re easy to set up and dismantle. All it takes is a bit of creativity. Now, that’s inspiring!