We came along to Fractangular to connect with friends, have a dance, spend a bit more time playing with the circus set and to discover if Fractangular really had grown past its party-minded selfishness. The open-air collaborative arts festival that is Fractangular is a conscious evolution from bush doof into something more creative, family-friendly and sustainable. This year’s production was granted additional funds by the Arts Council of Australia for its valuable contribution to the arts community here in Tasmania.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
It's been the festival on everyone's lips after the Circus Festival, so we decided to come and check it out.

The festival is held on private property in a remote location an hour and half northeast of Hobart, with designated camping areas separate from the music and arts precincts. Composting toilet facilities were constructed for the event, and huge generators provided the electricity for the vast quantities of wattage emanating from the speakers and lasers cutting the night sky.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
After driving past the gate, we are able to choose which camping area we prefer.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
We're a couple hundred metres from the main venue, parked amid a sea of tents in the grassy paddock.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
The dance floor has already been busy for 24 hours before we arrive.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
We're under the mandate of a complete fire ban, so the twirlers are using glow-in-the-dark poi and unlit brands to show their stuff.

Delaney dancing at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Delaney responds to the music and grooves alongside me.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
There's a pause between tracks as the deejays set something up.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Part of the fun of a festival is the opportunity to dress up in outrageous outfits and costumes, like this dragon suit that Lisa's wearing.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
As there isn't a designated chill space, people return to their campsites to wind down, listen to music or make their own.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Rough-hewn branches act as fences, and rubbish bags are provided for recycling and landfill. The festival organisers want to leave the land rubbish-free so everyone is being encouraged to take their own rubbish out.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Away from the main dance-floor, a market space holds some food-stands, little hops and a more intimate playing stage.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Alfred from Deloraine brought a sample of his Seppenfelt shop to Fractangular.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
The artist Selkin Parapet is also here, offering her magnificent collection of felted people for sale.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Toilets and urinals are conveniently located near the dance floor, but not so close to the camping area.

We arrived well after the party had already started, and in some ways we weren’t there for the main dance-floor. We’ve attended a bush doof as a family before, and while the kids loved watching the show, as a single parent I’m focusing on the girls’ entertainment rather than my own. It was the side-shows that kept us entertained. We discovered a designated kids’ space with trampoline, swings, a see-saw and jumping castle.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
The kids zone is set apart from the other areas and still central to all the action.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
A small jumping castle is an instant attraction for our girls.

Aisha and another girl at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Aisha quickly makes a friend when she joins someone on the swing.

Jumping on a trampoline at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
A trampoline is recessed into the ground and surrounded by mats, providing lots of safe fun for the kids who have come to the festival.

Face-painting at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
This is a beautiful example of the vibe that happens at festivals. The "official" face-painter is taking a break, but she let these young women use her equipment to paint each other in her absence.

Across the way, the Flying Fox circus had juggling accessories and hoops laying on the ground, with someone always available to give a hand in demonstration or technique correction. In this way, Fractangular was a natural follow-up to the CircusFest for those who had started learning certain skills two weeks ago.

Flying Fox Circus at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
The Flying Fox circus area is a great place to work on new skills acquired at CircusFest!

A slack-line was set up in the trees, and various people kept practising their techniques on it, providing both entertainment and inspiration to others who stood around and watched the show. Forget about simply balancing on the line, the goal seemed to be to bounce from a sitting position into an upright walk along the line.

Slackline at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
The slackline always attracts a number of spectators.

Our girls enjoyed the hammock village the best. Festival-goers had hung their hammocks up in a shady glade, and the girls quickly sussed out the most robust one for their games.

Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Festival-goers bring their hammocks to this communal area and leave them for others to enjoy.

Brioni in a hammock at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
Once she discovers the stand of hammocks, Brioni doesn't want to leave.

Hammocks at Fractangular, Buckland, Tasmania, February 2013
There's an ever-changing number of people dozing or chatting in the hammocks.

Delaney playing in a hammock, February 2013
I decide to lay down for a rest, too, but Dell takes it my actions as more of an invitation to play than to sleep.

Our girls do love to dance, but they felt intimidated by the crowd and the lack of other children dancing and chose instead to spend their time exploring the grounds with friends. Children were around — just not on the dance-floor, and I think Fractangular really has progressed into a family-friendly event. With younger children like ours, I didn’t stay up late, dancing until dawn. Instead, we retired to our bus and watched a movie while the music continued all night.

I was pleased to see teenagers camping with their families, dressing up in outrageous costumes and masking themselves with face-paint before walking up the tracks to the main stage. It’s encouraging to see whole families participating in events like this, and if our girls continue to be interested in the arts, we’ll likely attend Fractangular and other family-friendly bush doofs in the future!