Wombats, wallabies, sinking sand, beach-camping, friendly travellers and water-sports. All these are found at the centre of the northern coast of Tasmania — Narawntapu National Park, a highly recommended park to visit for a variety of reasons.

Located within a hour’s drive from Launceston, Narawntapu facilitates for campers as well as day visitors. There are powered camp-sites and horse yards close to the entrance of the park. Last night, we chose to drive to the end of Bakers Beach Road to camp closer to the beach. Even here, amenity blocks provide basic toilets and taps for campers’ use.

The wet sand of Bakers Beach has a peculiar quality which we really enjoyed. A combination of grit-size, texture and tidal water means that the beach is comprised of sinking sand. It’s not I’m-going-to-suck-Indiana-Jones-into-the-murk deep, but just enough to prove a lot of fun for us.

Sinking sand at Bakers Beach, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
"Help," the girls cry, "we're sinking!"

Camping at Bakers Beach, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
In the morning, we wake up in our peaceful camp-site, ready to explore the beach some more.

Delaney on a bush track to the beach, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
In the morning, we follow the short track back to the beach to play some more.

Sinking sand at Bakers Beach, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
With the lower tide, the width of sinking sand is greater, and we try stepping into each others' footprints.

Sinking sand at Bakers Beach, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
Another challenge is to walk on top of the sand without sinking in. It's easier for the lighter girls to do.

Sinking sand at Bakers Beach, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
It looks like even the birds sink into the sand here.

Bakers Beach, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
A few patches of beach have smooth stones left by the tide.

As I’d heard that there was wildlife here, and we still hadn’t seen much, I decided to drive us to another camping spot. We followed the gravel road right to the end, where a well set-up camping ground was much more populated than our previous location.

Camping at Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
Feeling that this is a more permanent park, I set up our awning and the slackline.

As the day begins to cool, we’re rewarded with sights of wildlife around our camp. Little wallabies hop quickly by, hiding in the bushes when we approach.

Blue-tongue lizard, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
Our presence scares blue-tongue lizard out of its place in the sun.

Wombat, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
A fellow camper alerts us to this wild wombat's arrival at dusk. It's obviously very used to people, although it shied away and hid its face in a shrub when the girls made too much noise. This is the first wombat the girls have seen in the wild.

Wombat, Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
The wombat stops eating long enough to scratch itself, giving us a look at its face.

The wombat was smaller than I remembered them to be, but perhaps I, too, was a child when I last saw a wombat in the wild, and that’s why I remember them as much bigger. It’s a privilege to be able to observe one so close, as wombats are notoriously shy, and I’m glad to share this experience with the girls.

Pink sunset at Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
Turning away from the wombat, we're captivated by the flamingo sky.

Paddling in the water at Narawntapu National Park, Tasmania, January 2013
Before we head back to the warmth of our housebus, the girls have one last paddle in the water.

The girls are so happy to be camping out in the bush again. They have their home back, they have the great outdoors to explore, we’re peaceful and enjoying each other’s company. This is what life is, what life should always be like — no matter where we park. Today, it just so happens to be here.