The trees in the back yard of our Queensland home are particularly noisy at this time of year. The Cadaghi gums (Corymbia torelliana) are in flower, and all the creatures want to join in the party!

Cadaghi gum in flower, Corymbia torelliana, November 2012
Our Cadaghi gums are in blossom at the moment.

Cadaghi gum in flower, Corymbia torelliana, November 2012
The pale blossoms fill the air with scent and attract birds, bats and possums.

Cadaghi gum in flower, Corymbia torelliana, November 2012
The ground beneath the gum trees is almost white from all the fallen blossom panicles.

Cadaghi gum in flower, Corymbia torelliana, November 2012
A fine layer of blossoms covers everything under the trees, including The Gifted Gypsy.

Rainbow lorikeet in Cadaghi gum in flower, Corymbia torelliana, November 2012
The parrots — like this rainbow lorikeet — love the nectar and squabble as they browse the tops of the branches.

Bat flying to a Cadaghi gum in flower, Corymbia torelliana, November 2012
At night, the bats are even noisier than the birds as they fight off the possums.

Calista with Cadaghi gum in flower, Corymbia torelliana, November 2012
The animals aren't the only ones interested in the blossoms. Our girls like to crumble them apart and play with the texture between their fingertips.

Delaney with Cadaghi gum in flower, Corymbia torelliana, November 2012
In the manner of most of her current games, Delaney personifies the blossom clusters into families and directs them to talk to each other. So cute!

Cadaghi gums are considered a weed in this location because they grow so well away from their native rainforest habitat. Although they make a mess, it’s nice having mature trees in the back yard, and I love the wildlife they attract to our our space!