Some people build fabulous homes for themselves. Others design their living spaces as informal retreats for celebration, healing and inspiration. The Rainbow Temple in Northern NSW is Guy Feldmann’s extraordinary love offering to humanity.

Camping at Boomerang Falls, Northern NSW, October 2012
We spend the night in a forest reserve not far from the Rainbow Temple.

Calista eating breakfast while camping, October 2012
As we eat breakfast, the girls enjoy being in Johnny's company again and show him all the pictures and projects we have on board with us.

Delaney with an umbrella, October 2012
It's raining ever so slightly when we arrive, but this is enough to bring out the umbrellas and gumboots!

Trees around the Rainbow Temple, October 2012
This part of the country is lush and green, and from the carpark, we can hardly see the Rainbow Temple.

Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
The thirteen main poles of the four-storey pagoda were erected on the day of the Jewish Passover (Easter Sunday) in 1981.

Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
A large stage area adjoins the main structure, providing an open-air venue for creative parties and musical collaborations.

Guy Feldmann, Rainbow Temple, October 2012
"The temple’s devoted to the story of life on Earth, a non-denominational gathering center," says Guy Feldmann, the temple’s owner, who has spent the last thirty years constructing the Rainbow Temple. "I realised in all the religions of the world there was nothing really devoted to the truth of life ... You can’t have one God which serves one people and another God which serves another ... So I built a temple devoted to that one exquisitely beautiful truth: that we are all one."

Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
Signs throughout the premises remind us of the sacred cause.

Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
Built entirely out of timber, the temple is a strict hexagon shape — like the Star of David.

Aisha and Brioni at the Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
Feeling at home, Aisha picks up some poi and starts twirling while Brioni settles into a hammock.

Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
In the communal kitchen, fabulous paintings brighten the wooden pillars.

African butterfly mask in Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
A huge butterfly mask from Burkina Faso, West Africa hangs above the kitchen. It was a gift from a events planner who used the Rainbow Temple for a wedding.

Trapeze bar at the Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
A trapeze bar hangs off to the side of the kitchen, waiting for someone to feel energetic enough for a swing.

Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
As people have passed through the Temple, staying from one day to several years, they have added to the artwork.

Lounge corner at Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
Still open-air, the lounging corner is heated by a wood stove fashioned from two wheel rims.

Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
Within the Rainbow Temple pagoda, wooden stairs lead to higher levels.

Lauren and Delaney at the Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
Delaney and I play with the large mirrors situated at each of the points of the floor-plan on the second floor.

Beds at the Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
The third floor contains simple beds for whoever wants to spend the night. Everything is still open-air, and mosquito nets protect against the bugs.

Delaney at the Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
From the balcony, Delaney watches her sisters playing in the courtyard below.

View from the Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
The guests wake to sights like these in the morning. This level and the one above it are the dedicated bedrooms.

Delaney collecting jacaranda blossoms, October 2012
Outside, the girls start collecting the fallen jacaranda blossoms to add to the Rainbow Temple's decorations.

Brioni laying flowers at the Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
Brioni transfers the fluorescent purple flowers from her upside-down umbrella to the sideboard.

It’s impossible to look around the Rainbow Temple without also meeting the travellers who are staying here. Today we meet guests from Melbourne, the U.S.A., Germany and New Zealand. Visitors can donate $30 for accommodation and food, of $140 a week. Those who contribute labour pay less, and some nothing. Guy’s not running a business, he’s offering his space as a retreat.

Michael at the Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
Although he can't speak to us today — he's spending the day in silence — Michael shows off his juggling skills for the girls.

Tunnel at Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
Since the Rainbow Temple is almost completed, Guy has started a new project on his land — a labyrinth of tunnels that run deep into the countryside. We peer down into the entrance, but we decide to take the tour another day.

Vegie garden at Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
The rain holds off so we can look around the grounds of the Rainbow Temple land.

Vegie garden at Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
On a hill, in the sun, a small vegie garden is maintained by guests and augments the kitchen's food supplies.

Totem pole at Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
A carved totem pole sits by itself in the grass. I love the way creativity breeds creativity in places that are open to artistic expression.

Buildings at the Rainbow Temple, Northern NSW, October 2012
The other buildings on the property are decorated in colourful ways.

When we leave, it’s with the certainty that we’ll be coming back. Now that the girls are familiar with the property, we’ll be able to stay for a little while and say hello to whoever is also visiting. The Rainbow Temple is open for guests at any time and welcomes those who want to contribute, create or meditate. I’m thankful that Guy has made this sacred space for us to enjoy, and I hope to come back soon!