As part of the Art with Altitude exhibition, we were privileged to watch Grin and Tonic show Warning: small parts on the weekend. Zoe and Ben held a very young audience captive with a mix of action, puppetry, audience-participation and sounds.

The story follows Syms Covington as he apprentices himself to Charles Darwin and sails from England to Australia. Syms has a penchant for collecting things, and his imagination provides a source of amusement for the audience while it drives his sailing companions to despair.

Grin and Tonic's performance of Warning: Small parts
As the character of Syms imagines odd creatures, we see a display on the screen behind him.

Grin and Tonic's performance of Warning: Small parts
The vomit gag garners a lot of reaction from the audience, particularly when the imaginary vomit is thrown onto the watching children!

Grin and Tonic's performance of Warning: Small parts
Charles Darwin is portrayed by a puppet. He is mentoring Syms in the art of scientific discovery and collection.

Brioni at Grin and Tonic's performance of Warning: Small parts
Seeing a live performance is a great way to celebrate's Brioni's birthday!

Grin and Tonic's performance of Warning: Small parts
A camera provides a live feed of accessories in a fish-tank, and they appear projected onto the screen in front of the audience.

The fish-tank projection was a very clever set. When shown on the big screen, it acted as different location back-drops for Syms’ specimen-collections and even once filled with water as he sank to the bottom of the sea.

Grin and Tonic's performance of Warning: Small parts
When Syms finally makes it to Australia, he meets the mysterious platypus for which he has travelled all this way.

Props from Grin and Tonic's performance of Warning: Small parts
The props for Grin and Tonic's performance *are* small and varied, and yet when displayed on the screen, they're in proportion to the live actors.

I was so impressed with Zoe and Ben’s performance in Warning: small parts. They played to a very tough audience — young and very young children — and yet kept us entertained and engaged. The finale of the show included a pro-environmental message to encourage children to carefully consider their collections so as not to negatively affect nature.