Since we first brought home the trailer, David’s been working on planning and fitting it out to make it into the ideal companion for his Freedom Truck. Now that we’ve made a couple short trips while towing the trailer, we’ve used the opportunity to see what it’s like to camp with.

The truck has previously worked well as a stand-alone camper-van, but with a larger family, we wanted a bit more space. Because the Freedom Truck looks like a commercial freighter, it has been ideal for camping incognito, and now that we like to take the canoe everywhere, we wanted to hide it from view.

I also wanted more room for the kitchen stuff, and David and I wanted to try sleeping a bit further away from the girls who like to wake up pretty early. After some modifications, the trailer fits our requirements perfectly!

Here’s what the trailer looked like before David started modifying it.

Trailer fit-out, October 2010
The trailer already had built-in shelving, which was a great basis for our plans. It also featured LED lighting in the ceiling, which is a great asset.

Trailer fit-out, October 2010
The side door lifted up to reveal a work bench area.

Trailer fit-out, October 2010
The walls were unlined aluminium panel, which meant that it was very poorly insulated (as we discovered one night when we slept in it!).

With David’s expertise in floorcoverings, the carpet on the floor was the first thing to go. It was replaced by commercial vinyl. Then David started insulating the walls with polystyrene sheets.

Trailer fit-out, November 2010
David added insulation onto the wall and roof panels, covering some walls with light timber board to provide a durable surface. He removed two of the centre roof panels and replaced them with opaque perspex to create a skylight.

Trailer fit-out, November 2010
The walls were covered with vinyl and then David started building in a box seat at the front.

Trailer fit-out, November 2010
The girls loved to come down and play alongside David. Aisha spent one whole day with him, helping out where she could and building an elaborate ship with polystyrene off-cuts.

Trailer fit-out, November 2010
David put hinges onto the bench-seat so the lid could be easily lifted up.

Trailer fit-out, November 2010
David added another shelf above the "kitchen" work bench, and the front bench seat gave Delaney a safe place to play while she could also watch what was going on.

Trailer fit-out, November 2010
The front of the bench-seat hides the prow of the canoe, and this photo also shows the skylight in the roof.

Trailer fit-out, November 2010
We'll use the inside of this bench-seat as a bed for Dell to nap in. It's well ventilated and separated enough from her sisters so she won't be disturbed.

Lauren packing the trailer, November 2010
My job has been to pack up the trailer, working out the best configuration for storage and sleeping.

Trailer fit-out, November 2010
This is the way we've currently configured the shelving, although it may change over time. The bottom row holds food storage, the second row holds clothes, and the third row is a double bed for David and me to sleep on.

We’re planning to head west into Outback Queensland with friends. This will give us some more experience in camping before we start travelling further afield.

It’s been great for David and I to work on this trailer together. These sort of joint projects have a great way of bringing us together as we work in tandem for a common goal.

It’s a joy also to have a husband who is so handy. I can express a desire for a shelf here, a hook there, a specific feature, and in a couple hours later, I discover that David has built it! Thank you so much for your time, David. I can’t wait to use the trailer!