The girls and I were having dinner at the kitchen counter when Brioni caught site of a flying fox climbing up the ladder outside our house. Fruit bats are very common in this part of Queensland, and we have hundreds that squawk and fight in our trees.

Flying fox, August 2010
We're still not sure why this black flying fox flew to our ladder and then started climbing onto the roof of our house.

So, when there’s a creature about, who do you call? David!

David catches a flying fox, August 2010
David climbed the ladder and caught the flying fox, using the towel to protect himself from bites and scratches.

David catches a flying fox, August 2010
They both checked each other out.

This was the first time David had ever caught a flying fox. They’ve never been within arm’s reach before, and if the ladder wasn’t there — he wouldn’t have been able to get the bat on this evening either!

We all had a good look at the mammal. Although originally transitory animals, flying foxes have happily adapted to urban environments where watered and manicured gardens mean a year-round food supply of nectar, blossoms, fruit and leaves.

Flying fox, August 2010
The flying-fox has a hook on the end of its thumb which is used to invert themselves when they go to the toilet, as a defensive weapon and to reach and climb. The bat's four other "fingers" provide the structure for its webbed wings.

Flying fox, August 2010
When David released the flying fox, it climbed rapidly up the nearest tree by using its hooks and feet.